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LINGUIST 3N03 COGNITIVE NEUROLINGUISTIC LAB

Academic Year: Fall/Winter 2014/2015

Term: 1

Day/Evening: D

Instructor: Dr. John Connolly

Email: jconnol@mcmaster.ca

Office: Togo Salmon Hall 506

Phone: 905-525-9140 x 27095

Website:

Office Hours: By Appointment Only



Course Objectives:

By the end of this class, students will be able to:

  1. Apply concepts and terminology that are specific to electroencephalography.
  2. Design an electroencephalographic experiment and develop hypotheses about the outcome.
  3. Carry-out an electroencephalographic experiment.
  4. Analyse electrophysiological data and inferpret the results.
  5. Evaluate experimental design factors and consider how they influence the results.
  6. Communicate scientific information in writing and by oral presentation.
  7. Participate as a member of a laboratory group.


Textbooks, Materials & Fees:

* This course will require students to attend laboratory group sessions on Fridays outside of this scheduled block of time. For more information, see the Laboratory Section description under Course Requirements.


Method of Assessment:

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

1. Participation is essential to success in this course. The majority of the graded work for will be prepared cooperatively with your laboratory group. We know that there are differences in the levels of participation individual members bring to the overall group functioning and to each assignment. For this reason, a grading practice will be implemented to address this issue. First, after each group assignment, group members will have the opportunity to evaluate (anonymously) themselves and others on their group participation and functioning during preparation for the assignment. Next, an initial grade will be assigned to the group based on the requirements of the assignment. Then, after the evaluations have been submitted, individual grades will be adjusted based on the feedback received. The average score for each individual in the group will be compared to the group mean (actually, standard deviations are used to score each student's grading). If you score higher than the group mean, your project grade is increased. If you score lower than the group mean, your project grade is decreased. 

2. Classroom Section requires regular attendance. The method of instruction will include lectures, active-learning activities, and presentations by the students in the course. Additional readings will be assigned and are essential to class participation because they will be relevant for successful completion of the Laboratory section of the course. The classroom schedule will vary between 1 hours and 3 hours in length and will be complimented by the hours spent in the Laboratory. The classroom section will ALWAYS begin at 2:30 and end anywhere between 3:20 – 5:20 (see the course schedule).

3. Laboratory Section requires regular attendance. Laboratories will be conducted in groups of 3-5 students where you will be trained in human electrophysiological acquisition and analysis techniques. You will practice and then apply your newly acquired knowledge of electrode application, EEG recording, and analysis to conduct an experiment examining the role of attention and memory on language processing. Each experiment will involve the testing of your fellow group members so that each member will both be the experimenter and the subject of the experiment. The laboratory schedule will vary between 1 hours and 3 hours in length and will be complemented by the hours spent in the Classroom section. Access to laboratory facilities is available on Fridays so that groups must coordinate and plan their laboratory time accordingly (see the course schedule).

 

NOTE ON AVENUE TO LEARN

In this course we will be using Avenue to Learn. Students should be aware that, when they access the electronic components of this course, private information such as first and last names, user names for the McMaster e-mail accounts, and program affiliation may become apparent to all other students in the same course.  The available information is dependent on the technology used.  Continuation in this course will be deemed consent to this disclosure.  If you have any questions or concerns about such disclosure please discuss this with the course instructor

EVALUATION:

Annotated Bibliography:                                                        15%

Experiment Proposal:                                                           15%

Laboratory Protocol:                                                             15%

Laboratory Report:                                                                35%

Group Presentation:                                                              20%

THE ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY (15%) is a group assignment meant to serve as a starting point for your laboratory group to developing a testable hypothesis in preparation for running an electroencephalography (EEG) experiment (see the assignment instructions and rubric posted to Avenue to Learn for further details). This group assignment is DUE October 3rd along with corresponding group evaluation assessments submitted by individual group members.

THE EXPERIMENT PROPOSAL (15%) is a group assignment wherein a research question will be proposed, methods outlined, hypothesis stated, and the rationale provided (see the assignment instructions and rubric posted to Avenue to Learn for further details). This group assignment is DUE October 10th along with corresponding group evaluation assessments submitted by individual group members.

THE LABORATORY PROTOCOL (15%) is a group assignment wherein the proposed methods for the group laboratory experiment will be detailed precisely into laboratory protocols (see the assignment instructions and rubric posted to Avenue to Learn for further details). This group assignment is DUE October 16th 11:59 PM along with corresponding group evaluation assessments submitted by individual group members.

THE PRESENTATION (20%) is a group assignment. The group will present to the class an outline of the details of the electroencephalography study carried out by the group (see the assignment instructions and rubric posted to Avenue to Learn for further details). This group assignment is DUE November 21st along with corresponding group evaluation assessments submitted by individual group members. A copy of each group’s presentation slides (in PDF format) will be submitted before scheduled class time on the same date.

THE LABORATORY REPORT (35%) is an individual assignment. It will be comprised of all of the major parts of a scientific report, including an introduction and review of the literature, a methods section, results section, and a summative discussion (see the assignment instructions and rubric posted to Avenue to Learn for further details). This individual assignment is DUE November 26th 11:59 PM. *The ERP lab facilities/equipment are both costly and shared by all of the class groups, as well as by other students and researchers. Failure to properly clean the equipment and facilities will result in a 5% deduction from the lab report mark for everyone in the offending group on the first offense. A second offense will result in a 15% deduction for the entire offending group. A third (and final) offense may lead to the suspension of lab privileges – this will seriously hamper (quite possibly prevent) your ability to achieve a passing grade in the course.


Policy on Missed Work, Extensions, and Late Penalties:

Policy on Missed Work, Extensions, and Late Penalties:

Late Assignments:  The components of this class are designed to build on each other. The timing of assignments and feedback is crucial to the completion of the laboratory component of the course. For this reason, late submissions for group work will not be accepted and will be graded 0%. In addition, the McMaster University Undergraduate Course Management Policy specifies an assessment ban effective on November 27th 2014 through the examination period. For this reasons, late submissions of the laboratory report will not be accepted and will be graded 0%.

Excused Assignments:  Assignments for which the instructor receives an MSAF or other medical document (via the office of the Dean of your Faculty) are excused and are not included in the final grade calculation.

Excused Tests: Tests for which the instructor receives an MSAF or other medical document (via the office of the Dean of your Faculty) have their value added to the value of the final exam.

McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF)

This is a self-reporting tool for undergraduate students to report absences DUE TO MINOR MEDICAL SITUATIONS that last up to 5 days and provides the ability to request accommodation for any missed academic work. Please note, this tool cannot be used during any final examination period. You may submit a maximum of 1 Academic Work Missed request per term. It is YOUR responsibility to follow up with your Instructor immediately (NORMALLY WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS) regarding the nature of the accommodation. If you are absent for reasons other than medical reasons, for more than 5 days, or exceed 1 request per term, you MUST visit your Associate Dean's Office/Faculty Office). You may be required to provide supporting documentation. This form should be filled out immediately when you are about to return to class after your absence.

 


Please Note the Following Policies and Statements:

Academic Dishonesty

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process.  Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage.  This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: “Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty”), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty.  For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located athttp://www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

  1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
  2. Improper collaboration in group work.
  3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

Email correspondence policy

It is the policy of the Faculty of Humanities that all email communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from each student’s own McMaster University email account.  This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student.  Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account.

Modification of course outlines

McMaster University reserves the right to change or revise information contained in course outlines in extreme circumstances. If a modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with an explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. It is the responsibility of students to check regularly their primary email account via their @mcmaster.ca alias and course websites.


Please Note the Following Policies and Statements:

Academic Dishonesty

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: "Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty"), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

  1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
  2. Improper collaboration in group work.
  3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

Email correspondence policy

It is the policy of the Faculty of Humanities that all email communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from each student’s own McMaster University email account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student.  Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account.

Modification of course outlines

The University reserves the right to change dates and/or deadlines etc. for any or all courses in the case of an emergency situation or labour disruption or civil unrest/disobedience, etc. If a modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with an explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. Any significant changes should be made in consultation with the Department Chair.

McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF)

In the event of an absence for medical or other reasons, students should review and follow the Academic Regulation in the Undergraduate Calendar Requests for Relief for Missed Academic Term Work. Please note these regulations have changed beginning Fall 2015. You can find information at mcmaster.ca/msaf/. If you have any questions about the MSAF, please contact your Associate Dean's office.

Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities

Students who require academic accommodation must contact Student Accessibility Services (SAS) to make arrangements with a Program Coordinator. Academic accommodations must be arranged for each term of study. Student Accessibility Services can be contacted by phone 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail sas@mcmaster.ca. For further information, consult McMaster University's Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities.

Academic Accommodation for Religious, Indigenous and Spiritual Observances

Students requiring academic accommodation based on religion and spiritual observances should follow the procedures set out in the Course Calendar or by their respective Faculty. In most cases, the student should contact his or her professor or academic advisor as soon as possible to arrange accommodations for classes, assignments, tests and examinations that might be affected by a religious holiday or spiritual observance.


Topics and Readings:

RESOURCES (ONLINE ACCESS)

WEEK 1:

  • Luck, S. J. (2005). An introduction to the event-related potential technique. Cambridge: MIT Press. Chapter 1 & Appendix: Basic Principles of Electricity

WEEK 2:

  • Sculthorpe, L., Collin, C.A. & Campbell, K.B. (2008). The influence of strongly focused visual attention on the detection of change in an auditory pattern. Brain Research, 1234, 78-86.
  • Friedman, D., Cycowicz, Y.M, & Gaeta, H. (2001). The novelty P3: an event-related brain potential (ERP) sign of the brain’s evaluation of novelty. Neuroscience and Biobehavioural Reviews, 25, 355-373.
  • Comerchero, M.D., & Pilich, J. (1999). P3a and P3b from typical auditory and visual stimuli. Clinical Neurophysiology, 110, 24-30.

WEEK 3:

  • Pulvermuller, F., & Shtyrov, Y. (2006). Language outside the focus of attention: The mismatch negativity as a tool for studying higher cognitive processes. Progress in Neurobiology, 79, 49-71.
  • Steinhauer, K., & Connolly, J.F. (2008). Event related potentials in the study of language. In B. Stemmer & H.A. Whitaker (Eds.) Handbook of the Neuroscience of Language. (pp.91-104). Academic Press: London.
  • Luck, S. J. (2005). An introduction to the event-related potential technique. Cambridge: MIT Press. Chapter 3

WEEK 4:

  • Kutas, M., & Federmeier, K.D. (2000). Electrophysiology reveals semantic memory use in language comprehension. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 4(12), 463-469.
  • Deacon, D., & Shelley-Tremblay, J. (2000). How automatically is meaning accessed: A review of the effects of attention on semantic processing. Frontiers in Bioscience, 5, 82-94.
  • Byrne, J.M., Dywan, C.A., & Connolly, J.F. (1995). Assessment of children’s receptive vocabulary using event related potentials: Development of a clinically valid test. Child Neuropsychology, 1(3), 211-223.

WEEK 5:

  • Duncan, C.C., Barry, R.J., Connolly, J.F., Fischer, C., Michie, R.T., Naatanen, R., Polich, J., Reinvang, I., & Van Petten, C. (2009). Event-related potentials in clinical research: Guidelines for eliciting, recording, and quantifying mismatch negativity, P300, and N400. Clinical Neurophysiology, 120, 1883-1908.
  • Luck, S. J. (2005). An introduction to the event-related potential technique. Cambridge: MIT Press. Chapter 2

WEEK 6: Luck, S. J. (2005). An introduction to the event-related potential technique. Cambridge: MIT Press. Chapter 4

WEEK 8: Luck, S. J. (2005). An introduction to the event-related potential technique. Cambridge: MIT Press. Chapter 5

WEEK 13: Connolly, J.F., & D’Arcy, R.C.N. (2000). Innovations in neuropsychological assessment using event-related brain potentials. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 37(1), 31-47.


Other Course Information:

COURSE SCHEDULE:

DATE

CLASSROOM

LABORATORY

W 1

Sept 5th

--2:30-5:20--

  • Course introduction
  • Brain imaging techniques
  • Principles of EEG/MEG
  • Refworks

Lab demonstration

  • equipment
  • set-up & clean-up
  • roles & responsibilities

Group Formation

W2

Sept 12th

--2:30-4:20--

Attention & Memory:

  • MMN & Oddball (P3a/P3b)

Laboratory group practice

W3

Sept 19th

--2:30-4:20--

Attention & Memory & Language

  • ERP/MEG in language research (general)

Laboratory group practice

W4

Sept 26th

--2:30-4:20--

ERP/MEG in language research

  • N400

Laboratory group practice

 

W5

Oct 3rd

--2:30-5:20--

Developing an experiment proposal & laboratory protocols

 

DUE: Annotated Bibliography

NO LAB

W6

Oct 10th

--2:30-3:20--

Principles of ERP Analysis Techniques

 

DUE: Experiment Proposal

Lab demonstration & practice

  • analysis

W7

Oct 17th

NO CLASS: consultations by appointment

 

DUE: Laboratory Protocols (Nov 16th 11:59 PM)

Laboratory group testing & analysis

W8

Oct 24th

NO CLASS: consultations by appointment

Laboratory group testing & analysis

W9:

Oct 31st

NO CLASS: Midterm Recess

NO LAB: Midterm Recess

W10

Nov 7th

NO CLASS: consultations by appointment

Laboratory group testing & analysis

W11

 Nov 14th

NO CLASS: consultations by appointment

Laboratory group testing & analysis

W12

Nov 21st

--2:30-5:20--

DUE: Group Presentations

NO LAB

W13

Nov 28th

--2:30-5:20--

  • Clinical Applications of ERPs
  • Course wrap-up

 

DUE: Laboratory Report (Nov 26th @ 11:59 PM)

NO LAB